Summer is not a season that people associate with having anxiety. But research has confirmed that higher levels of anxiety during seasonal transitions is common, especially in the summer months. To read more, check out this article.

Posted On October 31, 2019


Last spring, I noticed for the first time that as the temperature climbed, so did my anxiety. On one of the first hot days in May, as I was standing and waiting for the subway, I began to lose control of my body — my mind was full of intrusive thoughts, I was drenched in sweat, and I felt like I couldn’t stand up anymore. Hunched over, my body entered a seizure-like state. I landed in the hospital for the afternoon and learned that what I had experienced was called a vasovagal attack: a combination of low blood pressure, a sudden drop in heart rate, dehydration, and anxiety that caused me to faint. The heat and humidity affected me in a way I had never experienced before.

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From time to time, Palo Alto Health Sciences (Freespira) will share articles that discuss breathing techniques for panic attacks and other anxiety-related conditions that may not be consistent with the science-based and clinically-proven method behind Freespira. In such cases, we share the article for general informational purposes only, without any endorsement or recommendation.