A new way of treating anxiety and panic attacks – Dr. Bob Cuyler discusses Freespira on the Interactive Health Podcast

Did you know that a whopping 11% of American adults experienced a panic attack in the past year? In this episode, we sit down with Dr. Bob Cuyler to discuss the effectiveness of existing treatment options for people who suffer from anxiety and PTSD and the promising results from a new digital solution. We also discuss compelling science behind the body’s physiological response to panic and the surprising impact that these conditions can have on the American workforce, their employers and medical costs.

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80% of people using Freespira experience relief from their panic attacks. Call us today and learn how Freespira can help reduce your panic attacks too.

DANVILLE, Calif., April 11, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Palo Alto Health Sciences, Inc. (PAHS), developer of the drug-free Freespira® treatment for panic attacks and other symptoms of panic disorder, today announced that another study has demonstrated clinically significant symptom improvement, with 80% of patients panic attack free one year after treatment.

This latest study, conducted as part of the VITAL Program at Allegheny Health Network in Pennsylvania, also demonstrated a 50% reduction in healthcare costs in patients with panic symptoms 12 months after being treated with Freespira.

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“Since introducing Freespira in 2014 as a treatment option for patients with panic, we’ve seen tremendous patient quality of life improvements in a very short time. Many of these patients had been in therapy for years, and struggled with ongoing panic attacks. After using Freespira for the one month treatment, most were completely panic free.”. Kevin Caridad LCSW, PhD, Cognitive Behavior Institute

Anxiety in life is healthy. It is the body’s natural physiological response to stimuli that are perceived as dangerous. Also known as the fight or flight response to threats, it is the human survival technique. To experience anxiety is to consciously recognize that the self is in threat of imminent harm – be it physical or psychological.

A panic attack occurs when a person is stimulated by anxiety in inappropriate instances when there is no actual threat of imminent harm. Typically, the occurrence is seemingly random, sparked by nothing in particular. A person can experience a panic attack at any time in any context, for example: when out shopping, driving a car, being at work or even sitting on the couch.

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After years of panic attacks, Charyn finally tamed the #anxiety beast. Here’s exactly how she did it. And you can too.

I don’t remember when I had my first panic attack. Oddly, it didn’t coincide with the loss of my mother at the age of 17 or the deep-seated spells of major depression in my mid-20s. These mood-crushing moments seemed to rear their debilitating powers a decade or so later.

According to the mental health charity Mind, a panic attack is an exaggeration of the body’s normal response to fear or stress. When faced with a potentially threatening situation, the body gears itself up for danger by producing adrenaline for “fight or flight.” But if we produce too much, the surplus floods the body, causing feelings of absolute terror.

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Shortly after seven on a sunny spring morning in 2004, I freaked out in front of five million people. I was filling in on “Good Morning America,” anchoring the news updates at the top of each hour. I had done this job plenty of times before, so I had no reason to foresee what would happen shortly after the co-hosts, Diane Sawyer and Charlie Gibson, tossed it over to me for my brief newscast: I was overtaken by a massive, irresistible blast of fear. It felt like the world was ending. My heart was thumping. I was gasping for air. I had pretty much lost the ability to speak. And all of it was compounded by the knowledge that my freak-out was being broadcast live on national television. Halfway through the six stories I was supposed to read, I simply bailed, squeaking out a “Back to you.”

“There was a time when basic things—like driving, climbing a flight of stairs, taking a shower, or going through the checkout line at the grocery store—landed me somewhere between mortal unease and full-throttle terror.”

A single panic attack that struck out of the blue led to another and another and another, along with the pounding heart, tunnel vision, shaking hands, and inexplicable fear for her life that made it feel like there was no safe place in the world — even in her sleep. Her panic would stop at nothing.

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A reporter has a panic attack while on live TV. Watch how it changed his life.

Shortly after seven on a sunny spring morning in 2004, I freaked out in front of five million people.

I was filling in on “Good Morning America,” anchoring the news updates at the top of each hour. I had done this job plenty of times before, so I had no reason to foresee what would happen shortly after the co-hosts, Diane Sawyer and Charlie Gibson, tossed it over to me for my brief newscast: I was overtaken by a massive, irresistible blast of fear. It felt like the world was ending. My heart was thumping. I was gasping for air. I had pretty much lost the ability to speak. And all of it was compounded by the knowledge that my freak-out was being broadcast live on national television. Halfway through the six stories I was supposed to read, I simply bailed, squeaking out a “Back to you.”

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Take a simple self screening test to see if you’re experiencing #panicdisorder

If you suspect that you might suffer from panic disorder, answer the questions below, print out the results and share them with your health care professional.

To locate a specialist who treats panic disorder, visit the ADAA Find a Therapist.

This is a screening measure to help you determine whether you might have panic disorder that needs professional attention. This screening tool is not designed to make a diagnosis of panic disorder but to be shared with your primary care physician or mental health professional to inform further conversations about diagnosis and treatment.

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Learn more about the connection between diabetes and anxiety.

While diabetes is typically a manageable disease, it can create added stress. People with diabetes may have concerns related to regularly counting carbohydrates, measuring insulin levels, and thinking about long-term health. However, for some people with diabetes, those concerns become more intense and result in anxiety.

Read on to find out more about the connection between diabetes and anxiety and what you can do to prevent and treat your symptoms.

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From time to time, Palo Alto Health Sciences (Freespira) will share articles or blog posts from guest authors. Some of the information presented may not be consistent with the science-based and clinically-proven method behind Freespira. In such cases, we share the article or blog post for general informational purposes only, without any endorsement or recommendation.